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Bridget Ann BAKER
The Remains of the Father
Bridget Ann baker
The Remains of the Father
Vidéo expérimentale | hdv | couleur | 24:0 | Afrique du sud | Italie | 2012

The Remains of the Father: Fragments of a Trilogy (Transhumance) is an experimental film and installation. It considers marginally remembered Italian colonial history in Eritrea and Ethiopia between 1930 and 1941. An Eritrean researcher Lula Teclehaimanot discovers an archive of non-official ethnographic literature collected by a Bolognese couple Giovanni Ellero and Maria Pia Pezzoli who had worked for the ?Ministry of Italian Africa? in Eritrea and Ethiopia during that period. Lula has been tasked by the municipality of Asmara to translate from Amharic into Tigryna: A contribution to the birth of the colonial style, an unpublished manuscript written by Ellero promoting the rationale of a modernist Ethiopian architectural vernacular. While she works Lula listens to a radio interview conducted in Italian, Tigryna and Amharic about the contemporary relevance of proverbs in Eritrean and Ethiopian societies. Set within a single room of a derelict house in Bologna which had been built for retired fascist army officials, is also the imagined office of Ellero. Many of the documents laying about the office; Eritrean and Ethiopian proverbs, hand drawn maps, and family emblems and curiously amongst these are the traces of her own family history, collated by Ellero before she was born.

Bridget Baker is an artist from South Africa. She is based in London and Cape Town. Baker?s work is situated at the intersection of documentary and myth creation, forming a series of complex visual fragments realized through film making, installation and documented re-stagings. Baker`s practice and visual language, while based on in-depth research, is often speculative and nomadic, seldom offering a finite position on events or histories. Her work has been exhibited extensively but also at The Museum of African Art (NYC), MAMbo (Bologna, Italy) Centro des Artes Contemporanea (Burgos, Spain), Palazzo delle Papesse (Siena, Italy), Neue Berliner Kunstverein (Berlin), the 2nd Johannesburg Biennale (Cape Town), Bow Arts Centre (London), Glasgow Film Festival (Scotland), Dak?art 2012 (Senegal), Wapping Project (London), South African National Gallery (Cape Town), the South Africa National Arts Festival (Grahamstown, South Africa), and the Oberhausen Short Film Festival (Germany).

Bridget Ann BAKER
Jetty SCOUR
Bridget Ann baker
Jetty SCOUR
Vidéo | hdv | couleur | 20:53 | Afrique du sud | Afrique du Sud | 2014

Jetty SCOUR, suggests the physical markings left behind from a ships arrival and departure. Here is the present day ‘arrival’ of the “human-transporter”, a replicated 19th century cane-woven basket or ‘lift’ to a harbour in South Africa. The original would have been used off the coast of Algoa Bay in South Africa from 1890-1920 to lift colonial settlers to and from ships at sea before the development of harbours. Here the artist works with the object as historical witness, to engage with contested sites and legacies linked to the arrival of her own ancestors, a British settler family, to that same bay in 1820. The film, whilst documenting a contemporary working harbour within the economy of international trade, marks this space and place with historical encryptions, the smallest tensions, that refuse a “blanking out” of history.

Bridget Baker lives and works in London and Cape Town (b.1971, East London, South Africa). Her work is situated at the intersection of documentary and myth creation, forming a series of complex visual fragments realised through filmmaking, installation and performed re-stagings. Baker’s practise and visual language, whilst based on in-depth research into personal and public modes of representation within colonial and postcolonial narratives remains characteristically speculative, nomadic and estranging. Occupying the realm of the imaginary, the characters in her films, installations and photographs are spliced into roles as presences / witnesses / mirrors that enact lost memory within those peripheral places blind spotted by “official” history making.

Eduardo CACHUCHO
Flatland
Eduardo cachucho
Flatland
Vidéo | hdv | couleur et n&b | 8:5 | Afrique du sud | Belgique | 2014

Hendrik Verwoerd in an experiment he carried out in the 1930’s named ‘A Method for the Experimental Production of Emotions’ uses various combinations of colours and symbols to elicit in his test subjects various emotions. Verwoerd studied as a psychologist before ever entering into politics, even achieving a doctorate magna cum laude. His highly mediatic experiment goes on to succeed in its ambitions in creating: “compassion, shame, embarrassment, malicious joy, anger and vexation.” Flatland emerges from research into this experiment and how its outcomes could be overlaid onto the propaganda and media manipulation during the apartheid regime. Flatland takes the audience through a performance-lecture that traverses the research into the psychological experiments while overlaying juxtaposing them onto South Africa’s past and present. Simultaneously it makes a case for how language and emotion is used by politics today to control the masses.

Eduardo Cachucho is an artist and architect based in Brussels and Johannesburg. He is interested in how national, and trans-national, infrastructural developments can have long lasting rippling effects from their implementation. Delving into detailed historical research into specific topics, he collects references of historical events, documents, catalytic events, archival materials. These elements often find themselves in critical events that over time lose their importance, or blur their meanings and effects, or even change in their meaning of significance over the decades. His works act as interventions that reinforce or put into question these elements. Simultaneously his interest in performance and video work allow another entry-point into said research material and works, often being condensed into a performative action symbolising core elements of the research, presented as performance and video pieces within an installation.

Steven COHEN
Maid in South Africa
Steven cohen
Maid in South Africa
Film expérimental | dv | couleur | 12:0 | Afrique du sud | France | 2005

« Avec un réel engagement politique, Steven Cohen s?interroge sur le corps et son exploitation (faisant référence à la prostitution, le travail manuel éreintant, les rapports entre les différentes communautés?) et rend ainsi hommage à sa nourrice sud-africaine âgée de 84 ans, qui demeure depuis son enfance l?employée de maison au sein de sa famille ». (Extrait du programme Les Subsistances, Lyon, janvier 2005)

Steven Cohen est un artiste atypique né à Johannesburg dont l??uvre aborde de manière provocante les questions d?identité. Surtout connu pour ses performances, il apparaît sur scène ou dans des galeries, mais s?invite éalement dans des lieux publics. En tant que juif homosexuel, il traite de l?altérité et de l?identité de l?étranger en utilisant son propre corps et celui des autres pour créer de l?art vivant, sous la forme de sculpture, de danse contemporaine, de travestissement et de performance. Ces personnages glamour et monstrueux s?élèvent" du Lake Subconscious " pour confronter la société à ses composantes qu?elle a marginalisées et censurées tout au long de l?histoire. Ses performances ardues et souvent controversées explorent l?impuissance et la honte tout en célébrant l?hybridité complexe de l?identité.

Christo DOHERTY, Aryan Kaganof
Lamentation/Klaaglied
Christo doherty , Aryan Kaganof
Lamentation/Klaaglied
Doc. expérimental | hdv | couleur | 18:0 | Afrique du sud | 2015

Blackface in a film about a secret war Experimental SA documentary challenges hidden memories of a faraway and forgotten fight Blackface and South Africa’s secret border war are exposed and explored in a poignant and troubling new film by Christo Doherty and Aryan Kaganof, which was shown in Cape Town and Joburg (South Africa) for the first time in June 2016. For 23 years from 1967 to 1989, young white men were conscripted to kill and die for apartheid during a long deadly war on the border of Namibia and Angola. In 2011, Doherty presented his ground-breaking BOS exhibition of constructed miniature models and blackfaced conscript portraits based on the rare photographs leaked from the conflict zone, often at great risk to the photographers at the time. Described by its directors as an ‘experimental psychic documentary’, Lamentation is a filmic response to Doherty`s BOS exhibition of physical suffering,traumatic memory and the border war. Doherty and Kaganof’s 18-minute film is a formal meditation on the traumatic memory of an illegal war in which tens of thousands of young white South African men were forced to participate and uncounted numbers of black Namibians were killed or injured. It is a contemporary attempt to explore one of the unexamined aspects of apartheid’s military misadventures, a conflict which killed and injured unknown numbers of civilians and well as soldiers and left a generation of men and women traumatised on both sides of the conflict. The film makers are not afraid to challenge and to shock. And they stress that the film is about memories and understanding for all participants and victims of the border war, not only SA soldiers. Lamentation’s delicate musical score, by leading South African composer Michael Blake, accompanies the camera’s slow movement up the uniformed chest of a solemn white model with painted black face, cutting to scan a miniature scene showing the mutilated corpse of a black Namibian civilian alongside an armoured SA military vehicle. Throughout the film, the disconcerting and shocking imagery is presented through an insistently choreographed interplay of cinematography and sound design. “We know this is difficult material, but interpreted and constructed images in art are an important way to reflect on a war which we don’t think South Africa has fully dealt with,” Doherty says. “Many white men, including myself, firmly shut the door on their army days, yet the SADF was a dark formative experience which we need to expose and understand.” White soldiers: black faces The filmmakers’ portrayal of white men in brown army uniform with black faces sparked controversy in South Africa, but the use of this make-up was a survival mechanism in the war. The blackface device in the film and in BOS is based on the combat body paint used as camouflage in the Angolan bush by apartheid’s soldiers, ironically known to the white troops as ‘black is beautiful’. “White faces painted black are currently taboo, but were very much part of a conscripted white soldier’s experience during South Africa’s war in Namibia and Angola,” Doherty says. The photographs in BOS, and now Lamentation, use re-enacted representations of this wartime practice, together with miniature reconstructions of scenes of battle and violence, to probe the psychological and ethical transformation of young men who joined in an involuntary battle against a hidden enemy. Beautiful music: origins of a difficult film The film emerged through Doherty and film-maker Aryan Kaganof`s mutual involvement with the hauntingly beautiful music by South African composer Michael Blake, Tombeau de Mosoeu Moerane(2011) for soprano birbyne and 5-track (or 2-track) tape. Written in homage to the little-known South African black composer Mosoeu Moerane, the film score features Lithuanian clarinet virtuoso Darius Klysis playing the birbyne, a simple keyless wooden wind instrument. The conclusion to the film is underscored by an extract from another composition by Michael Blake, his String Quartet No 1, performed by The Fitzwilliam String Quartet. Cinematographer Eran Tahor’s beautifully choreographed and achingly-slow camera movements match the cadences of Blake`s music and provide a powerful visual sense of the isolated and estranging experience of South Africa’s war on a distant and dangerous border. The editing and sound design by Aryan Kaganof bring together the music and the cinematography with strands of found audio, including a voice softly singing fragments of "Die Stem van Suid Afrika", the old National Anthem.

Christo Doherty Christo is Associate Professor of Digital Arts in the Wits School of Arts at Wits University. He is a photographer and artist with a keen interest in the visual representation of conflict and trauma. He was conscripted into the apartheid army at the age of 17. Aryan Kaganof Aryan Kaganof is a South African film maker, novelist, poet and fine artist. His extensive filmography includes Threnody for the Victims of Marikana, Decolonising Wits, Western 4.33, and Nicola’s First Orgasm. Aryan left SA aged 19 to avoid conscription into the apartheid army.

Teboho EDKINS
My Gangsta Project
Teboho edkins
My Gangsta Project
Fiction expérimentale | dv | couleur | 9:0 | Afrique du sud | 2006

J?ai passé deux mois avec Jackals et ses amis dans un ghetto au cap, Afrique de sud. J?avais toujours eu l?envie de faire un film de gangster (comme un clip de MTV gangster rap mais réel). Plein d?attente, j'ai loué une grande bagnole, organisé un casting à Paris pour trouver une danseuse bien sexy. En effet, il me semble que ce qui fait un gangster c?est le contexte de la violence et de la pauvreté et mon film est devenu assez violent et bien que je filme une réalité ce n?est pas un documentaire.

Teboho Edkins est né aux Etats-Unis et a grandi au Lesotho, en Allemagne et en Afrique du Sud. Il est actuellement étudiant au Fresnoy, Studio National des Arts Contemporains, en France. Il a réalisé quatre films, "Ask me I am positive", "Looking Good", "True Love" et ce qu'il appelle son "First Gangster Project". Il travaille actuellement sur un autre film de gangsters au Cap et partira à Berlin en septembre.

Teboho Joscha EDKINS
Kinshasa 2.0
Teboho Joscha edkins
Kinshasa 2.0
Documentaire | 16mm | couleur | 11:7 | Afrique du sud | 2008

Une campagne Internet contribue à la libération d'un candidat à la présidentielle, emprisonné pour avoir parlé ouvertement de l'absence de démocratie. Oscillant entre une Kinshasa militarisée et Second Life (un chat virtuel tridimensionnel), le film examine le pouvoir subversif d'Internet pour la démocratie, tout en faisant un portrait inquiétant d'une capitale africaine.

Teboho Edkins est né aux Etats-Unis en 1980, et a grandi au Lesotho, en Allemagne et en Afrique du Sud. Il vit aujourd?hui à Berlin (Allemagne). Il a fait les Beaux-Arts de Cape Town et a été deux ans en résidence au Fresnoy, Studio National des Arts Contemporains, en France. Il suit actuellement le troisième cycle du programme de l?Académie du Film DFFB de Berlin. Il a reçu de nombreux prix et bourses.

Teboho Joscha EDKINS
Gangster Project
Teboho Joscha edkins
Gangster Project
Fiction expérimentale | 0 | couleur | 56:0 | Afrique du sud | 2011

In Cape Town, South Africa, one of the world`s most violent and unequal societies, a young white film student sets out with his cameraman, leaving the comfort of his protected neighbourhood. He wants to make a Gangster Film, with real gangsters. After a lengthy search for a suitably `cinematic` character, he finds the perfect gang and settles into their everyday rhythm. The reality soon catches up and the claustrophobic gangster life doesn?t exactly fit to the expectations. 20 year after the first democratic election, South Africa remains a deeply divided society, one in which dialogue and understanding seem impossible, out of reach. It is a film between fiction and reality, where real truths are revealed and fiction stops being fiction, and when it stops mattering.

Teboho Edkins was born in the USA in 1980 and grew up mainly in Lesotho, but also Germany, South Africa, France and now lives in Berlin. He studied Fine Art at the University of Cape Town, followed by a 2-year post-graduate residency at le Fresnoy, studio national des arts contemporains in France and then a post-graduate film directing programme at the dffb film academy in Berlin. His films have been screened in over 100 festivals and galleries worldwide.

Teboho Joscha EDKINS
Gangster Backstage
Teboho Joscha edkins
Gangster Backstage
Documentaire | hdv | couleur | 37:30 | Afrique du sud | 2013

Gangster Backstage is a documentary film with gangsters in Cape Town, South Africa. As the film moves between a casting interview and scenes in an empty theatre, the sense of confinement within the space increases and becomes a feeling of being trapped, a square, boundaries, a sort of purgatory, the tempo of cigarettes, not knowing where the soul goes, fear, caught in one's thoughts, wanting to break free but can't… a cell.

Teboho Edkins was born in the USA in 1980 and grew up mainly in Lesotho, South Africa but also in Germany. He studied Fine Art at the University of Cape Town, followed by a 2-year post-graduate residency at le Fresnoy, studio national des arts contemporains in France and then a post-graduate film directing programme at the dffb film academy in Berlin.

Teboho Joscha EDKINS
Initiation
Teboho Joscha edkins
Initiation
Documentaire | 4k | couleur | 10:47 | Afrique du sud | 2016

High in the mountains of Lesotho, Mosaku is anxiously awaiting the return of his older brother from an initiation ceremony. The initiates spend 5 months in a remote secrete location. When the boys return, they are grown men.

Teboho Edkins was born in the USA in 1980 and grew up in Lesotho, South Africa and also in Germany. He studied Fine Art at the University of Cape Town, followed by a 2-year post-graduate residency at le Fresnoy, studio national des arts contemporains in France and then a post-graduate film directing program at the dffb film academy in Berlin. His films show at film festivals, television, museums, win awards and have been acquired by private art collections. He currently lives between Berlin and Cape Town.

Simon GUSH
Analogues: Distance
Simon gush
Analogues: Distance
Fiction | hdv | noir et blanc | 17:42 | Afrique du sud | 2011

Distance, presents the absence of belief, where labour is estranged and invisibly services ?lifestyle?. Helen stays at a hotel for a conference, and has invited her sister and her nephew (Grant) to join for the weekend. After Helen leaves for the day?s session, Grant grows bored and listless after playing while his mother sleeps and wanders off into the hotel. He amuses himself for a number of hours playing in the corridors and spaces of the hotel, while occasionally voyeuristically watching the staff at work. He returns to the room to find Helen also at the door, her conference finished for the day. They sit in the room and Helen waits for Grant?s mother to return who is not there when they enter. The mother does return briefly, but only to change into something more suitable for dinner, and leaves again, to the silent frustration of Helen. Helen then also abandons Grant to his own devices while she goes off to her evening function.

Simon Gush (b.1981, ZA) is a South African artist currently based Johannesburg. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of the Witwatersrand in 2003. Gush was a laureate at the HISK (Higher Institute for Fine Arts) in Ghent, Belgium, in 2007/8 and a Gordon Institute of Performing and Creative Arts Fellow at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, in 2011. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions internationally and locally and has held solo shows at the SMAK (Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst) in Ghent (2010), West, Den Haag, the Netherlands (2010), and the Stevenson Gallery in Cape Town (2009 & 2010) and Johannesburg (2009 & 2011). Gush has been included in two international publications surveying young contemporary artists: the Younger Than Jesus Directory published by the new Museum in New York, USA (2009); and 100 New Artists by Francesca Gavin, published by Laurence King Publishing (2011). Alongside his artistic practice, Gush has collaborated in founding and facilitating a number of alternative temporary exhibition platforms, most notably the Parking Gallery in 2006, which was relaunched in 2012.

Simon GUSH, Gush
Iseeyou
Simon gush , Gush
Iseeyou
Vidéo | hdv | noir et blanc | 13:52 | Afrique du sud | 2013

The title of the film, Iseeyou, comes from the slogan of the first multi-racial trade union in South Africa. It is a meditation of the relationship of visibility to work. Exploring public monuments to work and workers in Johannesburg, it looks at how these have been celebrated in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa through public art. The film suggests that this celebration is a way in which the conditions of work, and often the abuse of the rights of workers, is justified through the promotion of a work ethic.

Simon Gush was born in 1981 in Pietermaritzburg, and is currently based in Johannesburg. He was a laureate at the HISK (Higher Institute for Fine Arts) in Ghent, Belgium, in 2007/8 and a Gordon Institute of Performing and Creative Arts Fellow at the University of Cape Town in 2011. Solo exhibitions have taken place at the SMAK (Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst) in Ghent (2010); and West, Den Haag, the Netherlands (2010); in addition to Stevenson Cape Town (2009, 2010 and 2013) and Johannesburg (2009 and 2011). Notable group exhibitions include My Joburg at La Maison Rouge, Paris,and the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (2013); Present Unlimited, Sofia Contemporary, Fabrica 126, Sofia, Bulgaria (2012); Mind the System, Find the Gap, Z33, Hasselt, Belgium (2012); Connections, Kunsthalle Luzern, Luzern, Switzerland(2011); the 2009 Luleå Summer Biennial, Sweden; and .za: Young Art from South Africa at Palazzo delle Papesse, Siena (2008). Alongside his artistic practice, Gush has collaborated in founding and facilitating a number of alternative temporary exhibition platforms, most notably the Parking Gallery, Johannesburg.

Simon GUSH
Calvin and Holiday
Simon gush
Calvin and Holiday
Vidéo | hdv | noir et blanc | 11:41 | Afrique du sud | 2015

Lazy Nigel explores the small industrial town of Nigel in the East Rand of Johannesburg during weekends. The video starts with its landscapes of industrial complexes and factories, devoid of employees. As the film and my filming -which took place over a number of weekends- progress, a variety of local activities are revealed. Many of the town industry employees leave to return to their families, who often lived elsewhere. I wanted look at what remained. The film explores laziness as a construct. I am interested in unpacking the fact that work is traditionally seen as the major locus of our identity. Time off from our jobs allows us to engage in other activities that may not be seen as productive in a traditional sense. These activities can be social, political or creative, allowing us to think of our value in different ways and, as such, offer new ways to think about our identity.

Simon Gush (b.1981, Pietermaritzburg), living in Johannesburg. He was a 2011 Fellow at the Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts, University of Cape Town, and completed postgraduate studies at the Hoger Instituut van Schone Kunsten in Ghent, Belgium, in 2008. Solo shows include After Work at Galerie Jette Rudolph, Berlin and 9 o`clock, at the National Arts Festival, Grahamstown (both 2015), Red at the Goethe-Institut, Johannesburg (2014); 1st and 3rd at Galerie West, The Hague, and 4 for Four at SMAK, Ghent (both 2010), in addition to six previous exhibitions at Stevenson, Cape Town and Johannesburg. Group shows include Artists Engaged? Maybe at Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon (2014); the 2nd Montevideo Biennial, Uruguay (2014); My Joburg at La Maison Rouge, Paris, and the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden (2013); Halakasha at the Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg (2010); 1910-2010: From Pierneef to Gugulective, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town (2010) and the 2009 Luleå Summer Biennial, Sweden. In 2015 the academic workshop Red Assembly, with African Critical Inquiry Programme was held in East London around his exhibition Red. Gush was awarded the Jury prize at the Bamako Encounters Biennale (2015).

Mocke JANSEN VAN VEUREN, Collins, Theresa
minutes 2010: time|bodies|rhythm|johannesburg
Mocke jansen van veuren , Collins, Theresa
minutes 2010: time|bodies|rhythm|johannesburg
Vidéo expérimentale | 0 | couleur | 12:0 | Afrique du sud | 2010

Time-lapse sequences shot at various public locations in Johannesburg blend into hybrid spaces. The locations include underwater shoots at public swimming pools over 24 hours, similar studies of the Bree Street taxi rank, as well as impressionistic studies of moments such as rain beating on a car windshield. These spaces interpenetrate and blend in the film, creating hybrid spaces: an underwater taxi rank with swimmers darting across the ceiling, legs of swimmers tangling in the branches of a Jacaranda tree during a summer storm, and giant ballroom dancers stepping through the taxi rank at the end of a commuting day. In this film we have explored the poetic possibilities of these hybrid, polyrhythmic spaces, moving into the realm of dream images rather than the sometimes harsh documentary studies from which the material is drawn. Still, dreaming about Johannesburg will always be to an extent disquieting. The interweaving of the rhythms of work and leisure time, as well as the underlying currents of class and race tensions within Johannesburg are absorbed by the camera, emerging as a questioning of the complex multiplicities of daily life experience in this often brutal city.

Mocke Jansen van Veuren was born in 1976 in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has worked in educational publishing and arts research in the non-governmental sector, as a professional animator and, since 2002, as a lecturer in Multimedia and digital filmmaking. In 2004, he started the on-going collaborative Minutes Project with Theresa Collins, documenting aspects of life in Johannesburg via time-lapse photography. Since 2006 van Veuren has collaborated with choreographer Nelisiwe Xaba in the creation of various performative works, focusing on sound composition and experimental video. He currently divides his time between the production of experimental films, the development of an analytical body of research, educational materials development, performative work, and lecturing at the UJ Multimedia Department and the Academy of Screen Arts (a new division of the Academy of Sound Engineering).
Theresa Collins lives and works in Johannesburg and graduated in 2002 with an MA Fine Art degree. The video and photography-based work she produces engages with elements drawn from her urban environment. She has worked in collaboration with Mocke Jansen van Veuren over the last 8 years and their preferred medium, time-lapse photography, lies somewhere between documentary film-making and animation. Their interest in time-lapse photography stems from studies in, and a passion for, the animation medium. Collins has recently worked as a researcher in the fields of education, heritage and history. She is currently working with the Market Photo Workshop as manager of curriculum and training.

Michael MACGARRY, -
Sea of Ash
Michael macgarry , -
Sea of Ash
Fiction | hdv | couleur | 11:57 | Afrique du sud | Italie | 2015

LOGLINE
A poetic re-imagining of Death in Venice, featuring a West African immigrant to Italy who embarks on a journey from the Alpine mountains to the seaside and ultimately, on a doomed voyage home. SYNOPSIS
The form of the film is one of a fable, that grafts Thomas Mann’s 1925 novella, Death in Venice, to the contemporary issue of African refugees and immigrants in Italy. The film takes Mann’s book as a nexus point and expands upon a number of themes inherent in it. In Sea of Ash, Mann’s character Tadzio is an immigrant to Italy from West Africa (Senegal) who has survived the treacherous and often fatal journey by sea. While the lead character of the original – von Aschenbach – is embodied in the unseen filmmaker himself. The narrative of the film follows Tadzio on a short journey from the remarkable Brion Cemetery at San Vito in the mountains of Northern Italy to the coastal area of the Venetian lagoon. On Lido Island he visits the famous Hotel dés Bains as featured in Luchino Visconti’s 1971 film version of Death in Venice. The film concludes on the dés Baines beach, with Tadzio embarking on a doomed attempt to return home.

Michael MacGarry is a visual artist and filmmaker based in Johannesburg, South Africa. He holds a Masters Degree in Fine Art from the University of the Witwatersrand. MacGarry is a fellow of the Gordon Institute of Performing and Creative Arts (GIPCA) at the University of Cape Town and recipient of the Standard Bank Young Artist Award 2010 (Visual Art). As a filmmaker he has written and directed five narrative short films, and five feature-length video artworks, and is a recipient of an El Ray Award - Excellence in Narrative Short Filmmaking, Barcelona Film Festival 2015 as well as a nominee for the Huysmans Young African Filmmaker Award 2015. As a visual artist Michael has exhibited internationally for more than ten years including TATE Modern, Guggenheim Bilbao, Kiasma Museum - and has published four monographs on his work.

Michael MACGARRY
Excuse Me, While I Disappear
Michael macgarry
Excuse Me, While I Disappear
Fiction | hdv | couleur | 19:10 | Afrique du sud | Angola | 2015

The film was shot on location in Kilamba Kiaxi, a new underpopulated city outside Luanda, Angola built by Chinese construction company CITIC and financed by Hong Kong-based China International Fund. The film follows a young municipal worker who lives by night in the old city centre of Luanda and works by day as a groundskeeper at the new city of Kilamba Kiaxi far away.

Michael MacGarry is a multi-award winning visual artist and filmmaker, having exhibited internationally for ten years including TATE Modern, Guggenheim Bilbao, 19th VideoBrasil, 62nd Short Film Festival Oberhausen, International Film Festival Rotterdam and Les Rencontres Internationales. He holds an MFA from the University of the Witwatersrand (2004). MacGarry has been researching narratives and histories of socio-economics, politics, forms and objects within the context of contemporary Africa for over a decade. Frequently focused on marking key registers of modernism – MacGarry creates sculptures, films, installations and photographs which look at the contextual specifics of things and their place; how they are simultaneously distributed both as ideas and as objects in the world. His sculptural work is formed through processes of grafting and mutation, to produce fictional hybrids principally designed to question systemic paradigms: sovereign nationality; logics of making and meaning; power relations; notions of value, equity and progress as well as the relationship between industrial technology and African resources. In his filmmaking and photographic work these macro concerns often take the form of micro narratives, personal memory and subtle identity politics in spaces where contemporary life is in a state of invention and flux.

Wendy MORRIS
Taste the World
Wendy morris
Taste the World
Animation | 16mm | couleur et n&b | 4:20 | Afrique du sud | Belgique | 2005

Taste the World dure quatre minutes et montre que les touristes perçoivent le Tiers Monde comme une cours de récréation pour l?Europe. Le titre vient d?une brochure pour les touristes qui exhorte les voyageurs à ?goûter le monde.? Le slogan de cette publicité sous-entend que le monde est là pour ?vous,? pour le ?vous? du connaisseur doué de discernement, le ?vous? que représentent les Européens et leur excès de temps libre. Sans frontières, le (?tiers?) monde est présenté comme le domaine du consommateur, un domaine qui offre des choix illimités : culinaires, sexuels, économiques et culturels. Le film commence et finit par un repas. Intercalée dans cette histoire, on trouve une référence au voyage de Sarah Bartman, la femme Khoi Sud Africaine qui a été exhibée en Europe dans les années 1700 comme étant le lien entre l?homme et le singe, et à son retour au pays. Elle mourut jeune à Paris et des parties de son corps furent mises en bouteille et montrées au musée de l?homme. En 2003, ses restes furent rapatriés en Afrique du Sud et elle fut enterrée.

Wendy Morris est une artiste du visuel née en 1960 à Walvis Bay en Namibie. De nationalité Sud Africaine, elle vit en Belgique. Elle a été Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts en 1994 à l?université d?Afrique du Sud. En 1999 elle est Honours Bachelor of Arts en histoire de l?art également à l?université d?Afrique du Sud. Et en 2004, elle a obtenu une maîtrise en arts visuels, toujours à l?université d?Afrique du Sud.

Wendy MORRIS
Bully Beef
Wendy morris
Bully Beef
Animation | 16mm | noir et blanc | 6:0 | Afrique du sud | Belgique | 2007

"Bully Beef" tente de relier deux histoires que l'on persiste à traiter séparément. En 1914, l'Allemagne envahie la "petite" Belgique. Ses alliés viennent à son secours. Il faut quatre ans et plus de quarante nations ou groupe ethniques - dont nombreux sont colonisés par les nations alliées- pour tenir tête aux impérialistes allemands. Le souvenir de ce traumatisme est toujours vivace en Belgique. Le tourisme autour de sites de bataille de la Première guerre mondiale est plus que jamais actif. Chaque jour, des bus remplis d'écoliers s'arrêtent devant les musées et les cimetières du Commonwealth à Leper et dans le Westhoek. On publie en Belgique de plus en plus de livres sur la Première guerre mondiale. En revanche, il y a de moins en moins de publications sur une autre invasion concernant la Belgique, survenue à peine trente ans avant 1914. De nombreux officiers et généraux décorés pour leur rôle dans la défense de la Belgique pendant la Première guerre mondiale ont pratiqué leur commerce non pas en Europe mais dans l'acquisition, le contrôle et l'exploitation d'un morceau de terre huit fois plus grand que leur terre natale, le Congo. La Belgique a fait au Congo ce que l'Allemagne espérait faire à la Belgique et à d'autres pays de l'Europe de l'Ouest. Repoussant l'invasion allemande avec l'aide de ses alliés, la Belgique a continué son invasion du Congo pendant encore quarante ans.

Wendy Morris est née en Namibie en 1960. Elle grandit à Johannesburg, en Afrique du Sud. Elle étudie les beaux-arts à l'université de Witwaterstrand et à l'université d'Afrique du Sud. Vivant actuellement en Belgique, elle est en doctorat à l'université de Leuven. Pour ses films d'animation, elle utilise de grands dessins au fusain qu'elle transforme et redessine. "Bully Beef" est son troisième film. Morris montre ses films, parfois en même temps que ses dessins, dans des galeries, des musées et à des festivals. Ses films ont été sélectionnés pour concourir aux festivals de Fantoche, Oberhausen et Annecy.

Wendy MORRIS
Off the Record
Wendy morris
Off the Record
Animation | 35mm | noir et blanc | 5:0 | Afrique du sud | Belgique | 2008

Off the Record explores the different experiences and treatment of black and white South African soldiers in Europe during World War I. Two documents form the basis of the film, a war diary kept by the artist?s great-uncle Walter, and a 1917 account by Sol Plaatje of the frustrated attempts of many black South Africans to play their part in the war effort. Points of convergence between these disparate histories are created through the process of animation.

Wendy Morris was born in Namibia (1960), grew up in Johannesburg, South Africa. She studied Fine Art at the university of the Witwatersrand and at the University of South Africa. Now living in Belgium and working towards a practice-based doctorate in the arts at the University of Leuven. She is currently a member of the art-science collaboration Parallellepipeda. Her animated films are made by filming large charcoal drawings that she alters and redraws. Morris exhibits her films, sometimes together with the drawings, in galleries, museums and on festivals. Her films have been selected for competition at such festivals as Clermont-Ferrand, Annecy, Oberhausen, DOK-Leipzig and Fantoche.

Cameron PLATTER
The Old Fashion
Cameron platter
The Old Fashion
Vidéo | dv | couleur | 16:7 | Afrique du sud | 2010

The Old Fashion, is an adventure in humour, love, loss and longing for something more? a mélange of The Third Man, an advertisement for Prince Barrack Hussein?s sports water/ penis combo, strip club dance montages, mysterious villains and co-conspirators, and a certain fast food restaurant on Asstropolis. It pays homage to movie remakes and sequels, franchise food, dumbed-down politics, and mundane beauty. It is a portrait of contemporary South Africa, through the eyes of a deranged cat dictator bent on world domination.

Cameron Platter (born 1978 Johannesburg) His work is an intoxicating vision of Good vs. Evil, documenting contemporary morality through the telling of simple stories drawn and appropriated from the media, TV, films, art, history, pornography, battle scenes, politics, music, and religion. His targets and influences include Lamborghinis, Kawasakis and beautiful women in fishnets; megalomania and the mass media; James Bond and Richard Pryor; corrupt politicians; penis extension machines and strip clubs; children?s stories, crime fiction and gangster films; Southern African woodcut and craft masters; tabloid horror stories; wildlife, real life and things falling apart? Mixing traditional and new mediums, Platter creates a tableau that is a sincere homage to historical themes, an ironical take on contemporary Africa, and an ultra primitive, anti-aesthetic view on what it means to be alive today in South Africa. Recent projects include: Hard Times Great Expectations, Whatiftheworld Gallery, Cape Town; I Am Lonelyness, Hilger Contemporary, Vienna; The Old Fashion, Volta NY, New York; Black Up That White Ass II, Youngblackman, Cape Town; Dak?Art, Biennale de Dakar, 1910-2010: Pierneef to Gugulective, South African National Gallery and Art 39 Basel, Switzerland. His work is included in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) New York.

Cameron PLATTER
YOU
Cameron platter
YOU
Vidéo expérimentale | dv | couleur | 15:59 | Afrique du sud | 2012

A video made up of a collage of Pastor Chris Oyakhilome?s sermon on the ?Power of Thoughts? as well as use sources such penis extension advertisements, visionary fast food chicken outlets, sex websites, eternal happiness, instant cash, waterfalls, abdominal machines, life solutions international, dancing dolphins, mass builder, fireworks, slogans, sub-tropical bondage, and celestial landscapes; all directed in my crude, minimalist filmic technique. The video should be viewed as an expanded, absurdist, collage; part documentary and part commentary.

Cameron Platter was born in 1978, Johannesburg. Recent exhibitions include ?Imaginary Fact, Contemporary South African Art and the Archive?, 55th Venice Biennale; ?Impressions from South Africa, 1965 to Now,? Museum of Modern Art, New York; Le Biennale de Dakar 2010, Dakar, Senegal; ?Coca- Colonization,? Marte Museum, El Salvador; and ?Absent Heroes,? Iziko South African National Gallery. Platter fills the ordinary and marginal, with incendiary new meaning. Working from everyday experience with subjects overlooked or considered delinquent, sordid and lowbrow, he reconnoiters notions and concepts on the outside fringes of South Africa?s popular culture. His work appears in the permanent collection of MoMA, New York; The FRAC des Pays de la Loire, France; and the Iziko South African National Gallery. His work has been highlighted in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Vice Magazine, NKA Journal of Contemporary African Art, Artforum, and Art South Africa.