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Akosua Adoma owusu
Catalogue : 2016Reluctantly Queer | Doc. expérimental | super8 | noir et blanc | 8:0 | Ghana | 2016
Akosua Adoma owusu
Reluctantly Queer
Doc. expérimental | super8 | noir et blanc | 8:0 | Ghana | 2016

This epistolary short film invites us into the unsettling life of a young Ghanaian man struggling to reconcile his love for his mother with his love for same-sex desire amid the increased tensions incited by same-sex politics in Ghana. Focused on a letter that is ultimately filled with hesitation and uncertainty, Reluctantly Queer both disrobes and questions what it means to be queer for this man in this time and space.

Akosua Adoma Owusu (b. 1984) is a Ghanaian-American filmmaker, producer and cinematographer whose films address the collision of identities. Interpreting the notion of "double consciousness" coined by sociologist and civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois to define the experience of black Americans negotiating a sense of selfhood in the face of discrimination and cultural dislocation, Owusu aims to create a third cinematic space or consciousness. In her works, feminism, queerness and African identities interact in African, white American, and black American cultural environments. Owusu's films have screened internationally in festivals like Rotterdam, Locarno, Toronto, New Directors/New Films (New York) and the BFI London Film Festival. Her work is included in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Centre Georges Pompidou, the Fowler Museum and the Indiana University Bloomington, home of the Black Film Center/Archive. Named by IndieWire as one of 6 pre-eminent Avant-Garde Female Filmmakers Who Redefined Cinema, she was a featured artist of the 56th Robert Flaherty Seminar programmed by renowned film curator and critic Dennis Lim. Her film "Kwaku Ananse" won the 2013 African Movie Academy Award. She has received fellowships and grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Knight Foundation, Creative Capital, the MacDowell Colony, the Camargo Foundation and most recently Goethe-Institut Vila Sul in Salvador-Bahia. Currently, she divides her time between Ghana and New York, where she works as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.

Akosua Adoma owusu
Catalogue : 2011Drexciya | Vidéo expérimentale | dv | couleur | 11:30 | USA | Ghana | 2010
Akosua Adoma owusu
Drexciya
Vidéo expérimentale | dv | couleur | 11:30 | USA | Ghana | 2010

A portrait of an abandoned public swimming facility located in Accra, Ghana set on the Riviera. The Riviera at one time was an upscale development, consisting of luxury high-rises and five star hotels. Since the 1970s, the Riviera has fallen into a disheveled state. This short documentary was inspired by afro-futurist myths propagated by the underground Detroit-based band Drexciya. They suggest that Drexciya is a mythical underwater subcontinent populated by the unborn children of African women thrown overboard during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. These children have adapted and evolved to breathe underwater.

Akosua Adoma Owusu (born January 1, 1984) is a Ghanaian-American avant-garde filmmaker and producer whose films have screened worldwide in prestigious film festivals, museums, galleries, universities and microcinemas since 2005. Her work addresses the collision of identities, where the African immigrant located in the United States has a "triple consciousness.” Owusu interprets Du Bois’ notion of double consciousness and creates a third identity or consciousness, representing the diverse consciousness of women and African immigrants interacting in African, white American, and black American culture. Named by Indiewire as one of the 6 Avant-Garde Female Filmmakers Who Redefined Cinema, and one of The Huffington Post‘s Black Artists: 30 Contemporary Art Makers Under 40 You Should Know, Akosua Adoma Owusu is a MacDowell Colony Fellow and a Guggenheim Fellow. Founded in 2007, her company, Obibini Pictures, LLC has produced award-winning films including Reluctantly Queer and Kwaku Ananse, which received the 2013 African Movie Academy Award for Best Short Film. Reluctantly Queer was nominated for the Golden Bear and Teddy Award at the Berlinale, Berlin International Film Festival in 2016. In 2010, Owusu was a featured artist at the 56th Robert Flaherty Film Seminar. Artforum listed Me Broni Ba as one of 2010’s top ten films. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Fowler Museum, Yale University Film Study Center, and Indiana University Bloomington, home of the Black Film Center/Archive. She’s received support from Creative Capital, Tribeca All Access, IFP, Focus Features Africa First, the Art Matters Foundation, the Camargo Foundation and the Berlinale World Cinema Fund. Owusu holds MFA degrees in Film & Video and Fine Art from California Institute of the Arts and received her BA in Media Studies and Studio Art with distinction from the University of Virginia, where she studied under the mentorship of prolific avant-garde filmmaker, Kevin Jerome Everson.

Catalogue : 2015Bus Nut | Doc. expérimental | hdv | couleur | 7:0 | USA | 2015
Akosua Adoma owusu
Bus Nut
Doc. expérimental | hdv | couleur | 7:0 | USA | 2015

`Bus Nut` re-articulates the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, a political and social protest against US racial segregation on the public transit system of Montgomery Alabama and its relationship to an educational video on school bus safety.

Akosua Adoma Owusu is a filmmaker and producer with Ghanaian parentage whose films have screened worldwide in prestigious film festivals, museums, galleries, universities and microcinemas since 2005. One of ArtForum‘s Top Ten Artists and one of The Huffington Post‘s 30 Contemporary Artists under 40, Owusu has exhibited worldwide, including at the Museum of Modern Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Rotterdam, Centre Pompidou and London Film Festival. She is a 2013 MacDowell Colony Fellow and a 2015 Guggenheim Fellow. Her company Obibini Pictures produced award winning films including Afronauts, and Kwaku Ananse, which received the 2013 African Movie Academy Award for Best Short Film and was nominated for the 2013 Golden Bear prize at the Berlinale. The French Cesar Film Academy Golden Nights Panorama program included Kwaku Ananse in Best Short Films of the year. Focus Features Africa First, Art Matters and The Sarah Jacobson Film grant supported Kwaku Ananse in 2012. She was a featured artist at the Robert Flaherty Film Seminar in 2010 and received the Africa First award sponsored by Focus Features in 2011. Owusu’s film Split Ends, I Feel Wonderful received the Tom Berman Award for Most Promising Filmmaker at the Ann Arbor Film Festival in 2013. Her most recent exhibitions include Prospect.3: Notes for Now in New Orleans, America Is Hard to See at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and The Art of Hair in Africa at the Fowler Museum in Los Angeles. Various universities and museums hold Owusu’s work for their research and permanent collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Fowler Museum, Yale University Film Study Center and Indiana University Bloomington, home of the Black Film Center/Archive. She has M.F.A. degrees in Film/Video and Fine Art from California Institute of the Arts and received her BA degree in Media Studies and Art with distinction from the University of Virginia, where she studied under the mentorship of prolific avant-garde filmmaker, Kevin Jerome Everson.

Ivan ozetski
Catalogue : 20051#Art Karaoke | Vidéo expérimentale | dv | couleur | 3:0 | Croatie | 2005
Ivan ozetski
1#Art Karaoke
Vidéo expérimentale | dv | couleur | 3:0 | Croatie | 2005

?Art Karaokes? Proposition pour le premier projet artistique karaoké par Ivan Ozetski. Le concept du projet : Mon idée était de transformer la recherche de ma vie et de mon travail dans un médium qui ne soit pas considéré comme un médium artistique. J?ai commencé à utiliser le karaoké comme médium, qui marchait parfaitement pour quelque chose qui pouvait aussi être interprété comme de la propagande pour ma recherche. Avec cette propagande, j?étais en fait en train de construire la base pour mes idées de la manière la plus simple possible, comme un peintre qui a besoin d?une bonne toile. Voici, afin de faire la différence entre le karaoké et mon ?uvre, un court historique de l?invention de ce dernier. Les véritables vidéos de karaokés ont une existence obscure, il s?agit en fait de répliques d'originaux, mais puisque leur raison d?être est de chanter par dessus, ou d?être présentée en publicité, elles sont arrangées en ce sens. Ce sont des productions privées, donc elles doivent faire du bénéfice avec le plus petit investissement possible. Elles ont pluseurs langues dans le sous-menu et de cette manière, on peut chanter dessus dans tous les pays. Je pense que le principal concept du karaoké est CHANT&VENTE !!! Mes vidéos n?ont pas pour but d?être vendues et ne sont absolument pas commerciales, je peux donc y utiliser n?importe quelle chanson avec le prétexte du projet artistique. Juste pour expliquer la différence entre le véritable karaoké et mon travail artistique, les véritables vidéos des karaokés sont très stéréotypées dans tous les pays du monde : Vietnam, Chine, Thaïlande, il s?agit presque d?un concept et pour les créer, il y a peu de règles, on peut en rigoler en en faisant sept commandements : 1. Rendre la production aussi bon marché que possible, 2. Utiliser des vidéos amateur pour le décor, 3. Mettre une femme seule pour les chansons tristes, 4. Choisir et créer une réplique d?une chanson populaire, 5. Mettre quelques chansons joyeuses, 6. Mettre des images de villes connues en décors, ou des plages de sable fin, 7. Le sujet doit être très joyeux, très amoureux, ou très triste. Mes vidéos de karaokés utilisent ces lois, mais pas toujours. Mon travail contient des question personnelles sur un artiste inconnu, ou sur les livres d?histoire de l?art. Avec mes textes, en sous-titre du karaoké, j?essaie de commenter le travail d?un artiste particulier, ou s?il/ elle appartient à l'histoire de l?art, construire au hasard, sans approche logique.